Archive

CEWEP Ireland periodically commissions research and reports to help inform Irish waste management policy makers. A selection of our commissioned reports and other relevant research can be downloaded below.

JUNIPER CONSULTING: THE CHALLENGE AHEAD: FINDING OUTLETS FOR MBT IN IRELAND

This briefing paper was commissioned by the Irish arm of CEWEP in 2008 with the aim of raising awareness amongst policy makers of the key issues associated with mechanical biological treatment of waste in Ireland.

(opens in a new window)Click here to view the report

JUNIPER CONSULTING: 10 QUESTIONS ABOUT MBT

This briefing paper was prepared indenpendently by Juniper Consultancy Services in 2007. CEWEP Ireland commissioned the report to inform the debate over the choices being considered for Irelands residual waste management strategy.

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WASTE TO ENERGY AND CLIMATE CHANGE REPORT

Research on behalf of the Dutch Waste Management Association has found potential to reduce Carbon dioxide emissions in the EU via a balanced policy that promotes prevention and recycling, and at the same time the generation of energy from waste. The findings show that if waste-to-energy were to replace landfill for residual waste in Ireland, between 622,000 to 821,000 tons CO2 per year would be avoided. This is equivalent to taking approximately 200,000 cars off the road every year.

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INTERGOVERNMENTAL PANEL ON CLIMATE CHANGE:
IPCC FOURTH ASSESSMENT REPORT:
CLIMATE CHANGE 2007: WORKING GROUP III: MITIGATION OF CLIMATE CHANGE

http://www.ipcc.ch/publications_and_data/ar4/wg3/en/ch10.html

CEWEP Ireland is concerned that there is excess landfill capacity. The submissions below seek to ensure that any undue expansion of that capacity is limited.

CEWEP IRELAND SUBMISSION TO EU WORKSHOP ON LANDFILL OF WASTE IN DUBLIN
EXCESS LANDFILL CAPACITY

A principal threat currently facing Ireland in meeting the Landfill Diversion targets is excess landfill capacity over and above the current “need”. A successful integrated system can only develop in Ireland if landfill capacity is constrained or otherwise disincentivised. This will allow other technologies higher up the waste hierarchy to develop, leading to a more sustainable waste management system.

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CEWEP IRELAND MAKES A SUBMISSION TO NEVITT LANDFILL PLANNING APPLICATION

As part of a nationwide campaign to highlight the impact of excess landfill capacity on the development of alternative waste management technologies, a submission was made to the oral hearing.

Click here to view the submission

CEWEP IRELAND EXPRESSES CONCERN AT LATEST LANDFILL TRACKER FIGURES

CEWEP Ireland has reviewed the national capacity and the amount of residual waste going to landfill in 2007. The findings show that the quantity of residual waste going to landfill has increased on 2006 which makes Ireland’s task of meeting the 2010 landfill diversion target an increasingly impossible one.

To see the Landfill Reliance Briefing Paper, click here B04_CEWEP_Landfill_Briefing_July232008.pdf

CEWEP IRELAND MAKES A SUBMISSION TO DREHID LANDFILL PLANNING APPLICATION

CEWEP is making this submission as part of a nationwide campaign to highlight the impact of excess landfill capacity on the development of alternative waste management technologies, such as waste-to-energy. It is critical that any new landfill developments do not exacerbate the current oversupply in landfill capacity and continue Ireland’s over reliance on landfill for waste disposal.

(opens in a new window)Click here to view the submission B04_CEWEP objection to Drehid_May08.pdf

 

Landfill is considered to be the worst environmental option for waste management and is the lowest preference in European and Irish waste policy. This is because landfills recover very little material or energy value and release the most greenhouse gas emissions from waste.

The EU has set targets to reduce Member State reliance on landfill and help minimise emissions from waste. Meeting these targets will pose a huge challenge to Ireland, where over 65% of municipal waste (MSW) was sent to landfill in 2005. This represents an increase on 2004, meaning that Ireland is moving away from its first landfill diversion target in 2010.

Waste-to-energy can provide an alternative to landfill and help Ireland make greater progress towards its targets. It works well as part of a waste management system that prioritises waste prevention, reuse and recycling.

For this reason, The National Strategy on Biodegradable Waste favours waste-to-energy as a preferred treatment method for residual waste.

“all countries with high landfill diversion rates use thermal treatment for a considerable proportion of traditional, ‘mixed waste’ collection of BMW [biodegradablemunicipal waste]”

NATIONAL STRATEGY ON BIODEGRADABLE WASTE.

The Flanders region of Belgium is one of the best performing regions in the world for waste management. It boasts recycling rates as high as 71% and a landfill rate of only 4%. The remaining 25% residual waste is treated in waste-to-energy plants.

FLANDERS, BELGIUM